From the category archives:

Music

Naples, September 1974.

“Anni di piombo” (“The Lead Years”) has little nostalgic resonance in the US. Unlike “Mai ‘68”, which instantly evokes exhilarating scenes of French student occupations, demonstrations, police brutality, wildcat strikes, riots, and barricades. (And perhaps some fervent threesomes if you made it through Bertolucci’s The Dreamers.) While Mai ‘68 appears retrospectively as both the unfulfilled apex and mythic nativity for so many –isms of the late twentieth-century, the tumultuous anni di pombo are largely overlooked despite the radical political and cultural activity maintained by the Italians for a decade after similar movements had withered in France and the United States. [click to continue…]

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52 Examples of Jewish-American Sheet Music from the Early 20th Century. A collection of English-language sheet music, ca. 4-8 pp. each, in orig. color illus. wrrps., most published in New York, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, or Los Angeles, ca. 1900-1920. (47699)

Early Jewish-American Sheet Music_Title

“Under the Matzo Tree: A Ghetto Love Song,” “Yiddle on your Fiddle Play Some Rag Time,” and “At Abe Kabbible’s Kabaret,” aren’t the songs that made legends of Jewish-American composers and lyricists like Irving Berlin, George Gershwin and Jerome Kern. Their celebrated contributions to the history of American popular music and modern styles of ragtime, jazz and blues for vaudeville, musical theater, radio, and eventually film have eclipsed their modest beginnings as song-pluggers and composers churning out campy sheet music titles like these for parlor room entertainments and novelty acts in New York City’s raffish Tin Pan Alley. [click to continue…]

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Collection of Invitations, Programs, Flyers, Posters, Broadsides and other Ephemeral Items pertaining to the Palladium nightclub, June 1985 – May 1987. ca. 170 items ranging from single sheet to folding invitations, pop ups, and physical objects, executed in print processes including letterpress, stencil, silk screen, and off-set lithography, most in vibrant color. Items ranging in size from approx. 3 7/8″ x 3 7/8″ to 23″ x 28″, loose as originally issued. N.p. (New York) 1985-1987. (47729)

Steve Rubell is said to have declared, “Artists are the rock stars of the 80s.” The notorious nightclub owner and his business partner Ian Schrager ran Studio 54 before their arrest and incarceration for tax evasion in 1980. In May 1985 they opened the Palladium nightclub, designed as a celebration of this unprecedented alliance between art and pop culture.  [click to continue…]

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