From the category archives:

Japan

Kitazawa Yoshio, Hamada Masuji, Wantanabe Soshu, Tatsuke Yoichiro, et al. Gendai Shogyo Bijutsu Zenshu.  (“The Complete Commercial Artist”). 24-volume-illustrated series (each vol. approx. 100-150 pp. including plates).  4to.  Wrpps.  Tokyo (Ars) 1927-1930.  (46209)

Over the past five years or so, a loose cadre of visual data miners at blogs including BibliOdyssey, 50 Watts, but does it float, Accidental Mysteries, Agence Eureka, and La Boite Verte (to name but a few) have collectively developed an on-line pictorial archive of inestimable value to artists and graphic designers who wish to renew their powers in the streams of history. [click to continue…]

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Sawada, Yozo. Insatsu Taikan (Great Atlas of Printing).  Unpaginated album.  Sm. folio.  Silk-covered boards, tie-bound.  Osaka (Nihon Insatsu Kaisha) 1915.  [46467]

Following the death of his father, the Meiji Emperor, on July 30, 1912, Crown Prince Yoshihito ascended to the Chrysanthemum Throne of Japan to become the Taishō Emperor. After three years of Imperial preparations, Yoshihito’s public coronation took place in November of 1915.  The leaders of industries which had thrived during the Meiji period of modernization wisely turned out to pay tribute to the young monarch.  Proud of their accomplishments during his father’s reign, Japanese printers and publishers marked the occasion with lavish commemorative publications.  Insatsu Taikan—the Great Atlas of Printing—showcases the remarkable quality and innovation of printing in Japan, ca. 1915.

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Teruhiko Yumura, et al.-. Shinjuku Playmap.  Nos. 1 (July 1969) through 30 (December 1971) (all published in the first series).  8vo.  Wrpps., covers illustrated by Teruhiko Yumura (also known as King Terry and Terry Johnson).  Tokyo 1969-1971.  [46471]

What Power is This?

What power is this, indeed?

The global tidal wave of youth culture rebellion and experimentation of the late 1960s and early 1970s did not bypass Tokyo.  Shinjuku ward—home to the city’s municipal government and its busiest commuter rail center—was the local substation through which powerful new currents in music, fashion and visual art flowed in and out of Japan.

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